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Merchandising

Get Retail Inspiration From Our Project Spotlight

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Get Retail Inspiration From Our Project Spotlight

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The Running Well Store Project Spotlight
 

Already the owner of two successful stores in the Kansas City area, Kathy Gates wanted a very different design direction for her third store so she called 3 Dots Design. 

One of the fun unique features we brought to life for Kathy is a large front window art piece depicting the iconic Kansas City sky line. This sky line is made up of many smaller photos, all of her awesome customers. A second area that really shines is dubbed the "AID STATION". This area consists of a counter for customer to gather after local runs or while trying on shoes and take part in hands on GPS demonstrations and nutrition sampling. (See photos below) 

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Here are a few thoughts from Kathy on what it was like to work with 3 Dots Design. 
3 Dots Design was great to work with! They really take the time to figure out the right look and feel for the owner, the company culture and the business. This is my third location and it's very clearly the most thought through and professional looking location. We wanted to bring in elements from Kansas City and the running community and they had many great ideas to bring my vision to life. 

How is the new store different from your other two stores? 
I learned a lot from opening my second location. The biggest lesson is that it's easier and cheaper to not learn lessons the hard way. I hired 3 Dots Design because I wanted direction figuring out the best way to structure the store for the best use of the space, the most economical way to build it out, how to have customers flow through the space, etc. Having experts that can tell you tips and tricks to getting the most out of your space saves time and money in the long run.

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3 Dots Design Company Spotlight

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3 Dots Design Company Spotlight

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Boulder Digital Arts featured 3 Dots Design in their newsletter
this week. Check it out!

3 Dots Design is a strategic retail design and visual merchandising company that aligns brands with consumer needs to create exciting and enticing retail environments.

With over 50 years combined experience in the specialty run, cycling, outdoor and active apparel industries, the 3 Dots Design team consults on strategic retail design and merchandising with retailers and manufacturers in those arenas. They have also worked with clients in the yoga, coffee, college bookstores, cannabis, womens fashion channels among others.

Before starting 3 Dots Design, Holly Wiese had been well acquainted with run specialty retail by working at the iconic Playmakers running store in Michigan, her native state. After starting 3 Dots Design in 2009, she consulted in the bicycle industry where she oversaw all aspects of retail design and visual merchandising for Giant Bicycle, the world’s largest bike manufacturer.

In 2005, Holly met Andy Davis while working with Giant Bicycle and he has been the lead designer for the company since its inception. With 2 other full time employees; Ryan Wiese and Adam Batliner, and many contractors “on call” around the country, the 3 Dots Design team can easily expand or contract its workforce as needed for various projects and retail rollouts.

They find most of their projects to be located out of state, throughout the country however, they always love working local when they can. A few of their local store design projects include the iconic Neptune Mountaineering remodel, Boulder Cyclesport South, Smartwool Cherry Creek and Ramble on the West end of Pearl Street in downtown Boulder. They’ve also designed 2 of the Denver area Runners Roost stores and worked on the Go Far Smartwool partnership store on East Pearl, also in Boulder.

In addition to designing retail environments and product fixtures, they also spend a good amount of time travelling the country speaking at stores and trade show events. They recently returned from training retailers on how to improve their visual merchandising and how to sell more apparel at a bicycle retailer event in Minneapolis called Frostbike.

3 Dots Design also hosts an annual or semi-annual training workshop for all retailers called Rocky Mountain Retail Camp (www.rockymountainretailcamp.com). This event always proves to be very exciting for visiting retailers and it’s loaded with lots of training sessions and hands on merchandising practice at local stores.

If you have a moment to swing by Neptune Mountaineering, be sure to grab a coffee in their new café and take in their new digs. 3 Dots Design was proud to work with the new shop owners to bring their vision to life as well as to design their new logo, graphics, signage, fixtures and store layout.

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3 Reasons Why Using Mannequins in Retail Increases Sales Between 10-35 Percent

Mannequins in Marketing: Major Money-Makers for Merchandisers

In the world of fashion merchandising, the number one rule is: The better it is displayed, the better it will sell.

Nowhere is this more obvious than with the use of mannequins in your retail store. Research indicates that apparel sales increase with the use of mannequins by anywhere from 10 to 35 percent, making mannequins one of the best investments you can make for your store.

But why do mannequins work so well? The answers are many, but consider just a few:

1) Mannequins offer your customers a three-dimensional view.

Many customers may have trouble visualizing how an article of clothing will look in real life if it is simply displayed on a hanger. This is particularly true in the case of clothing for women. For instance, mannequins offer an easily relatable view of the positioning of necklines and hemlines.

2) Mannequins create eye appeal and visual interest.

Because clothing displayed on a mannequin stands out from a rack of similarly fashioned apparel, it triggers an emotional purchase response. Some fashion merchandising experts believe this response occurs in as little as seven seconds. At its best, merchandising aims to evoke such an emotional response. When customers engage on an emotional level, sales increase exponentially.

3) Mannequins promote easy upselling opportunities.

Mannequins make it easy to demonstrate entire outfits rather than simply single items of clothing. Adding accessories like jewelry, belts, shoes, and handbags encourages shoppers to make additional purchases. If you’re in the sportswear world, adding things such as gloves, hats, reflective pieces or water bottles would be a great way to increase your add on sales. Combining multiple store items in this way allows a customer to envision more clearly a completed outfit. Even mannequins included on wall displays can work for this purpose if apparel is layered or accessorized properly.

The Bottom Line

Mannequins are unique in their ability to engage customers. They provide strong visual appeal, and trigger an emotional purchase response. Increasing sales by as much as 35 percent, they are an investment worth every penny.

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Boulder, Longmont retailers adopt a moveable feast approach to shopping

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Boulder, Longmont retailers adopt a moveable feast approach to shopping

By Shay Castle

Staff Writer

POSTED:   04/21/2017 03:06:04 PM MDT | UPDATED:   4 DAYS AGO | by the Daily Camera

Jacob Dana has coffee and works on a project at Rapha Cafe and bike store at 1815 Pearl Street. For more photos, go to www.dailycamera.com. (Cliff Grassmick / Staff Photographer)

Sleepy Pearl Street shoppers can take themselves to one of downtown Boulder's dozen-plus coffee shops for a cup of joe. Or they could dash into Rapha, a cycling apparel store.

In need of a taco and a new bike tire in Longmont? CyclHOPS Mexican Bike Cantina has got you covered. Or put some pep in your step via an espresso and a pair of shoes at Flatirons Running.

These local retailers and others have hopped on the hottest trend in retail by offering food and drink to keep customers in the store and off online shopping sites.

"There's so much pressure on brick and mortar to differentiate from the Amazons of the world," said Russell Chandler, owner of Boulder-based Full Cycle. "Anybody can buy a high-end road bike online; you can go find a mobile repair shop. Shops run the risk of going out of business if they don't find ways to build more community."

Full Cycle is in the process of adding a 16-tap beer, wine and coffee bar to its downtown digs (1795 Pearl St.) which it hopes to have open in the coming weeks. Chandler sees it as a way to bring in more bodies and, hopefully, boost revenue.

"We host a 200-person women's bike club that might like to finish their ride up with snacks and beer," he said. "And we rent a lot of bikes to tourists who might want to sit down for a drink when they're done."

Rapha, a cycling apparel store that just moved in up the street (1815 Pearl St.), has "ended up being more of a hangout than a store," according to General Manager Pete Loptino. "People can look at their product if they're interested, but it's more about the culture of cycling."

In addition to the coffee bar, Rapha has a flat-screen TV that will always have a cycling race on it and hosts regular social rides that leave from the store. It's part of building an experience that turns shopping into "more of a social event," said Holly Wiese.

Wiese is a retail specialist at 3 Dots Design, a Boulder firm that specializes in store re-designs that boost profits. More and more lately, that includes adding coffee or sandwiches.

"Over the last three to five years, we've seen it popping up all over in bike, run and outdoor."

The trend isn't limited to active retailers. "Banks are adding full coffee bars," said Allen Ginsborg. (Boulder has one of those, too: the infamous Capital One Cafe that inspired a temporary bank ban on the Pearl Street Mall.)

According to Ginsborg — who develops shopping centers, including Longmont's Village at the Peaks — nail and hair salons are getting in on the game, too, offering wine and beer to customers.

"It's about creating an experience, an environment where people want to linger," he said. "Customers have higher expectations these days; you need to provide something that makes them want to return."

That's particularly important as options for shoppers proliferate online.

Internet retailers, dominated by Amazon, added $27.8 billion in apparel revenue alone between 2005 and 2016, according to Morgan Stanley. Department stores during that time lost $29.6 billion in apparel revenue, and major retailers from Macy's to Best Buy are closing dozens of stores.

Making physical shopping more efficient is the key, said Chad Melis of Oskar Blues, which operates Longmont bike shop/taco joint/bar CyclHOPS. By offering more than one service, customers can accomplish multiple tasks at once and reduce their trips.

"You kill two birds with one stone — you come in and drop off your bike to get some work and you can have lunch."

"It takes a little creativity" from a business standpoint, he added, "but combining revenue streams makes the concept healthier financially."

Tacos and beer haven't necessarily boosted revenue for the bike shop: Melis sees it more as a marketing play for Oskar Blues' bike line REEB Cycles, a way to "show who we are and what we contribute to Longmont's culture."

The local trend is new enough that it's not clear if the effort is boosting sales, though Wiese says her cafe-adding clients in other states have seen a bump. But Full Cycle's Chandler is hopeful that when the brews start flowing, the cash will follow.

"You just test-rode an $8,000 mountain bike, you sit down and have a beer — you might talk yourself into buying it."

Shay Castle: 303-473-1626, castles@dailycamera.com or twitter.com/shayshinecastle

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